Craig Black — Taking Risks and Blazing Your Own Trail

11 May 2020 | Episode 3
Share:

Craig Black is a Scottish-born Independent Graphic Designer, Lettering Artist & Typographer.

Having spent the first few years of his career in leading design agencies in London, Craig now runs his own design studio in his hometown of Gourock, near Glasgow in Scotland.

His work has been celebrated and published internationally by leading design magazines and exhibited at conferences across the globe. In this episode Craig talks about creative collaborations, starting your own studio, goal setting, using personal design projects as a marketing tool, landing dream projects, and speaking at major design conferences from Brisbane to Barcelona.

Connect with Craig Black on LinkedIn. 

 

Craig’s profile: 

Craig Black is known for his bespoke and innovative typographic illustrations, visual identities, packaging, murals, installations and everything in between. His strengths lie in his ability to cross disciplines without the restriction of a fixed personal style. This versatility has offered him the opportunity to work on a varied mix of collaborations with local and international clients of all business backgrounds.

Typography and lettering are just the starting point of Craig’s work. He can handle any type of brief and works just as well on projects with specific constraints or complete creative freedom. He believes in creating engaging, modern and precise visuals whilst maintaining originality in all of his work.

His work has been celebrated and published internationally by Computer Arts, Creative Review and IdN Magazine — in addition to regular features by online media. His work has also been exhibited across the globe from London and Barcelona to Australia and Dubai. He is also known across the public speaking circuit for sharing his inspiring story at conferences and creative events around the world.

He is also the Co-Founder and Creative Director of Creative Inverclyde — a social enterprise aimed at utilising the creative sector to be the nucleus for positive social change across Inverclyde and Scotland.

 

Episode Contents:

  • Craig’s favourite brand
  • His creative childhood
  • What he loves about his work
  • Creative collaborations, how to get them right, and why relationships are so important
  • Being a ‘One-man-band’ — playing all roles in the studio 
  • What drives him each day
  • His time in London, practising his craft
  • Starting a studio after 2.5 years experience
  • The importance of goal setting
  • Using personal projects as a marketing tool 
  • Getting your work published by leading publications
  • Landing his dream project
  • Speaking and working at ‘Off Festival’ in Barcelona.

Read Transcript

Please note, this transcript was done through AI software and is not 100% accurate.

Dan:
Hi, this is Dan Rowell, Founder and Brand Strategist at DSR Branding and you’re listening to Discover Someone Remarkable: Conversations worth sharing. Join me as I interview passionate founders and industry experts. People who think differently, challenge the status quo and building a legacy. People who I consider, truly remarkable.

Dan:
In today’s episode, I interview Craig Black, an independent designer lettering artist and typographer, having spent the first few years of his career in leading design agencies in London. Craig now runs his own design studio in his hometown of Goroke near Glasgow in Scotland. His work has been celebrated and published internationally by leading design magazines and exhibited at conferences across the globe. I first met Craig in Brisbane in 2018 when he presented the design conference. In this episode. Craig talks about creative collaborations starting your own studio goal setting, using personal design projects as a marketing tool, landing dream projects and speaking at major design conferences from Brisbane to Barcelona. Craig is incredibly open and sincere, and his passion for his craft is infectious.

Dan:
His story is one of taking risks, hard work and backing yourself to achieve your goals.

Dan:
I felt inspired, motivated and energized from speaking with Craig. I hope you enjoy this conversation.

Craig:
So Craig, thanks very much for coming on the podcast.

Craig:
Thanks for having me.

Dan:
So we’d like to kick things off with a bit of a icebreaking question. So what’s your favorite brand and why?

Craig:
I would see my favorite brand as Nike. Probably cause from an early age, I’ve always kind of believed in the brand, actually. Like always for the sports and football specifically. And when I say football, that’s soccer. And, yeah, it’s just one of those brands that I’ve always kind of inspired me. And then one of the things is seen like my favorite football player has been sponsored by Nike over the years, which just kind of incredible. And I love the kind of marketing campaigns growing up. Obviously, from the sports kit as well, special football kits and stuff that like that kind of got me into that typography lettering also. Let’s see, you know, that kind of amazing stuff. The debate over the years has just been really, really incredible. Yeah. And just basically all the athletes and stuff. Because I’m very like I’m beginning with football and big into sports and stuff. So it was a perfect brand for me to grow up with. And now to this day, like all of I buy is Nike Air Max Trainers. So I still believe in the brand and I still love it. So it probably. Yeah. It’s my favorite brand.

Dan:
Yeah. It’s pretty interesting because I was having a similar conversation with Matt yesterday and I actually said that I’m pretty much a walking billboard for Nike as well. So we share that in common.

Dan:
I remember the amazing Nike football ads. I think it would have been like early 2000s or late 90s of just all the pro football players. I think like Ronaldo and who’s the Dutch guy who used to wear the cool glasses?

Craig:
Edgar Davids.

Dan:
Yeah. Yeah, he looks awesome.

Craig:
One of the early ads I can remember maybe back in the 90s and it was stronger like Superstars of football like that’s some proper super style back in the day. It was like Eric Cantor not paramountcy, you name it. It’s yes, it was in Rome and it was like that he would roll. And it’s like these football players get dates like the devil, like all the demons and stuff. And I remember when I first saw some of that video, I was was a young lad. And I was petrified that in the video. But when I saw these double players like five days away in terms of football and ended up beating them and I was like, all these shows off think look less like that show inspired me. Like, I want to be like those people. And was too close. So even all these eyeballs and stuff like it’s such an inspiring thing to see, especially a young age. At that point I had no idea what was going on, not so much when I was like playing against demons like that, you know, giving blood, they real or not. But it was just awesome to see in lady. She’s the echo that we some of them were like Assassins’ and ninjas and stuff of like I was different level. And to be honest, they probably struggled ever since to capture those, like, brilliant campaigns before. I’ve never seen done as good as that, actually.

Dan:
I mean, the production level in those was just incredible. I remember they always do it around a World Cup and I think Adidas or Adidas always sponsor. There was like the ball sponsor of the World Cup and then Nike would just come out and release like a ridiculous. I actually do surveys. They do like audience polls on who is the major sponsor of the World Cup. And I’m pretty sure I read, like most people would actually attribute it to Nike just because that sort of hijacked the whole thing. But by releasing something of that level, it’s just. Yeah. Again, such a cool production value.

Craig:
I know. I know. I always remember the Brazil national team won and they’re in the airport and it’s like they’re like the real Renaldo Roberto Carlos. And yes, I like kicking the ball about and stuff.

Dan:
They booted off the back of plants and stuff, was it that one?

Craig:
Yeah. Yeah, I see. One came in through security stuff.

Dan:
We’ll have to post some of the links, the YouTube links in the show notes to provide so context. So moving on, like is that something that inspired you in terms of designer or creative?

Craig:
It would have definitely, one hundred percent football and how it’s kind of marketed by and was probably the main driver for me, like when I was young, you know, like I was craving a sense of like I was both in staff and doing stuff. I’m just having fun. I wasn’t drawn all the time. I was always playing like in the garden and I was in treehuts doing crazy stuff, jumping off trees and stuff around and there so it wasn’t exactly like I was and drawn all the time. It wasn’t nothing. My got back and I was always playing football so. Oh, so I would always ask for like new football boots and new football top. probably more like nike orientated it was like the colors and the football badges and the tape on it, on the football badges, Israel and undisclosed sources Israel. So these all played a part of by you know like m flutes and tape over legend and late in life all that I can not even late in life when I was younger. I always question how silly these things were made. But given the odd fantasy pair of football, we’ve made the calls on the ball like football. But haven’t these always key? And I won’t my studio city and that cannot stand and am in the light and it can transfer into this, can eat up tables and legend and no, I’m fortunate. Get over. She needs to pump too much aid to create these kind of things as well, which is just incredible. So, yeah, that’s kind of what I understand from really is a sport and not like I love football and stuff. So they split a huge influence in college and especially that in my life of creativity and design.

Dan:
And were you from a creative family? Do you have brothers and sisters who were creative as well?

Craig:
So first the reason I loved it is because I followed my big brother. Now our guy is like Don Cliff. And if I say so, he’s just like a typical lives, like he’s somebody like you. Let us suppose nobody d doesn’t know what is up to it today. Like I’ve never cement tile. Well, you can say clean in of playing football. He’s a good player. But I did not know. And my mom was sick actually. If so she was a hairdresser and she was so amazing with that. We it was a.D.A design. So when we were younger like. So it was me mold and my mom. And we had this like meeting in Paris with small apartment. And she would cook. Baconator has to use using like she was like actually FIES and she would customizer I didn’t like and B since the winds likes to and me get fucking awesome. Like the whole house is both. It’s amazing stuff with us. And always remember when like trains and stuff came at our house and it wasn’t big at all, like it was perfect for us. But people used to be a little wild by how amazing the interior looks because my mom was like just on point and it wasn’t like expensive stuff.

Craig:
It was just the way she customized everything. And it was it really inspired me, actually, a lot of muscle in my faith that my life really has. And my mom’s always kind of encouraged me to indicate Eric. So when we were like young girls that I you desire like draw. So I was always I would do stuff in terms of like electrics, Electric’s Lego glue and stuff. People craft all those kind of things. I use my hands mainly and I’m getting a pain so and just causing chaos truly and really feeling punished up from an early age. My brother was just too busy playing football and so you just let me go do my thing. So yeah, like, I was always encouraged from an early age to go do. I’ve always done what ever made me happy, really, and fortunate. Laughs Like, it’s all kind of carried on to my my adult life. And I’m so doing what I’ve done when I was younger. You really are.

Dan:
So what do you love about the work you do?

Craig:
There are various things. But I love the fact that it can make an impact and it make a difference in people’s lives in terms of like I was the one from a design point of view, I mean, I definitely suffer most business and by that I mean profile, arming the business successful. But the flip side of that is actually a lot of my work is now clean kind of artwork and it’s such a big enjoy. If it was life so unified, do you do like an installation, like seeing someone smile? It brings him joy to their life is such a special feeling. And to be able to convey that it’s a special thing to do and something ops and love doing, it is like interacting with people. So usually with doing like any kind of public artwork or designs, I feel like seeing people interact with the walk. While I’m creating that, I see some being created in front of their eyes. It’s quite a special thing. So it makes people think definitely and it makes people feel good and happy. And I thought about my work. I loved the interaction and I’m a I love talking to people in shared and why I do stuff like that. So I’m very fortunate to be in a position to do these kind of things.

Craig:
And that’s probably the greatest joy I get over. And to be honest, I love the fact that I’m constantly challenging myself and pushing my skillset as well, like one day I could be doing a brand in a workmark for a brand and then the following day a mural. And then the following day I could be creating a sculpture sales called the whatever, and then fall on deaf to be painting a piece of tape on Wootten or something like that. I love the versatility and the digestive must go set and constantly challenging myself. And that’s huge and benefit my career because every project I’m working on is dated and Dufferin and challenging. But it all stems around take off and left in the national pride myself on an absolute love. I did like our own sadducees a joke, a tweet like I see it is something that I love to do and like is as I’m playing again, even though I get paid and some professional business stuff, I wake up every morning like positive and really happy and excited to go to the studio and figured I want what I need to do. So I’m better than something today about changing.

Craig:
Am I doing a brand? Am I. That’s like to get on like that. Sounds vaidya like kind of a fable of what bloody hard to get to this point to make these things possible. So it’s kind of an accumulation of stuff. And also another thing that I love to do is it’s like that when I’m building. These projects are artworks designed, whether it be is a that can collaborate with other people and mother design those creatives himself and bring them along and make them a part of this whole project and process as well is really quite special. And somebody is really drawn to me in the last couple of years as well, because I like people who are especially independent designers and starts today. The site is controlled and I want to say it’s like the dialectic at ownership. What has meaning? Like how many are working on something? Like to buy a company or an illustrator, a designer or someone to join me on a project? Like I’m very open and collaborative and I want them to bring as much ideas to the table as possible. And if it goes best I can every day, they like to do it and go for it. I love that aspect to.

Craig:
And that what does this opens up a more collaborative approach. And I love that aspect of it. And that’s something that I’ve learned to do more and more over the years, especially because when you start all well, when I started also, it was just me. Sighs I don’t mean. But is that more and more again, bigger projects to have more deliverables to it than I need to expand my team, which is like what? Not bring a freelancer and stuff. So it’s been more open to that. And that’s another part of it, a space of work with other people as well. Even though I’m a one man band, I still love that collaborative approach.

Dan:
And yeah, no, I mean, as you can tell it’s pretty cool to hear the different projects. And we’ll make sure we share the range because I think the scope and the projects that you do is what’s quite fascinating, quite remarkable about the work you do. How do you find collaboration with other creatives and how do you do that over across borders or do you do that online or do you guys have to be in person to do some of them?

Craig:
I personally prefer collaboration with people that I like. So I think that for me, it’s rather didn’t look at the portfolio. We’re not stuck in tremendous work when I don’t go, nor the passion I get on with passion that I’m going to find a struggle to collaborate with someone, someone to collaborate, know are very, very good friends of mine and actually rely on them. I have to trust them to do the best they can possible do. So I collaborate with people from all across the world, but it usually takes time. I get to that point. I’m actually watching. Does our relationship been built beforehand? I’ve been in a situation before where what with freelancers and unfortunately I didn’t have that. Maybe it was like a deadline or the team against me that I had to walk two lines about. Maybe they know as well, and you’ve definitely got a fantastic portfolio. But when they started working with me, then actually deliver the level that shows in the portfolio. And that was a total landed cost for me is a friend.

Craig:
I quit Hardiman’s for change, actually, and I’m like, fucking hell!

Dan:
It’s so shit when you bring in a team like I remember my early days and, you know, it’s hard because the person you’re dealing with doesn’t potentially have the relationship with the client. Whereas, you know, if it’s if it’s a paid product commission project, it’s much harder because you’ve got the relationship with the client. That person, you know, who’s the freelancer doesn’t. So they don’t feel the same accountability that you do. But then the client doesn’t care. You can’t really go back oh sorry mate I was let down. The person will be like well, you know, you said you have it done.

Craig:
Yeah. Yeah. Let’s go on. And you know, what happens is like when distri onset, for instance, is not Harvard and Yale and you need to redo the work and then it becomes very quick. Like there’s so much work involved in your ending, you know, so much time and ice just becomes a shit show. So, no, I think it’s three or four times that that’s four times over a public use and then have with those issues.

Craig:
So I always make sure that Kellogg really should just let people know. So and when both of those relationships, all those kids out once once they understand the situation that I’m in Israel, like if I’m the one dealing with the kind of staffing dictates, like the understanded patients that I’m under. And I think that’s a big thing because the best thing is will offend is a deal. Deal if you can bend over backwards for friends and help them out, then they’ll do it for you. And that’s been a big thing for me. So no obstacle to a place where if I go, I’d be just a total corporate strategist, a designer. Like I’ve got a bunch of people who know I can trust and go to it right away. Yeah. And then they say, let’s eat cake like Apple stock. I can’t do it just now. Then they will recommend as I can, you know, I mean, someone do it passionately. What w you know, I mean, it’s not personal recommendation means a lot, you know, like well and as can really benefit me is that those pension recommendations box. Usually even on the elephants that is collaboration’s is when I work with clients as well. I always aim to build a relationship with a client first and foremost before even design gets done, because I always believe that a good relationship will provide a much better outcome on the project. In the process of that ad, like I don’t want raffia clients in the States. And those clients I know, friends who started off as one project has like to see a full projects on the outcomes must be just purely because their relationship is a means. The process is much better that way, you know, hold organically. So yeah, I believe in relationships first and foremost. And then from that and the talent and the what will come of it kind of. That I believe I’m passionate.

Dan:
I completely agree. I mean, I think we’ve always found with our work, like the best projects are the ones where you can have open, honest conversation for the clients, and you feel like you’re part of their team or, you know, it’s an extended part of the team, rather than keeping at arm’s length and trying to keep everything very business, very professional when it’s a lot more relaxed and open and you can have tough conversations with them where you can provide honesty. Like you just said, I’ve get so much better work out of it and then they keep coming back.

Craig:
Yes, do you know what? I get to be sure you’re so right. There is one thing for me is that I’m very honest and transparent with clients. And diabetes is like if something comes up and I’m like, I really can’t do it, then I’ll say I cannot do this. However, I know X, Y and Z can do that and they can come on board the project and stuff. And even then, Sanja, like I say, it’s a blessing. Can you do that. Slatin a walk four straight day. A specific style and I’ll be like No like rather than absolutely stressing myself out a challenge myself like I’ll be honest and say no like I could get it done for potentially you know you can at least another week because the technical scolded needs for that stuff. You takes more than two days, you don’t need it. So because I was realize this cycles they use a lot of other independent freelancers will do say yes. And then they will to like they work two days of like 12 hour shifts, can try to do this piece of work and then they kill themselves and maybe then execute it as well because then rest or they arrest mind correctly. And so I will be honest and tell the client this. And because of that, I’d say that I’ve actually had a really warm response because, um, because I feel come back to me says, I’ll be honest, I most of which I’ve just said yes, but decide that you’ve come back pushbikes it. No, he actually makes me think. But the whole course of how you do your work. Great. And I was like, yeah, I’m not me because I don’t want this. You can’t do that.

Dan:
End up giving you the work and just an extended deadline, you know, to pick, to be honest with us. We don’t actually need it by Friday, if you can get it by Tuesday.

Craig:
Which always tends to happen. It’s always an extra few days.

Dan:
Completely.

Craig:
If they say to me like we need, that’s absolutely done by Friday. That’s a lesson. Well, maybe it need to be a simplified version of the state that you’re wanted. Like, let’s take out that age of detail that you were talking about over, because if you want for us personally, access what needs to be done. I think so. It’s been honest and frank about it, which is benefit me personally. I can’t speak for all the people, but that honesty has really benefited my career and has led to ongoing work with these people and being realistic w deadlines and stuff. I don’t give it only to speed things. I had to walk late to help them out. Of course I have. But if it’s something that I can get through and it saved my life, you want the specific statement and yes, you need to wait a couple of days or something like that to get you out.

Craig:
You need to get set up by mental and physical aspects of doing much. I do a lot myself by hand. So it’s on page, on paper and there’s a pain. And that’s called an artist page. It’s like if I’m using my hands for eight hours a day, like I’m getting comp pains in my forearms.

Dan:
And I was going to ask, do you get like, did your hand cramp up? I remember like doing tests at school and you’d be writing an essay for three hours and you’d have to, like, shake out your hand and it would be all cramped up.

Craig:
These are things that the clients don’t understand.

You know, do you know what I mean? I needed to be taken as an accountable author and where they don’t know the process around it. Specially when it comes to mural design, the physical aspect and the mental aspect of a mural design is hard as fuck. It really is, because you think about it, if you’re painting a mural, you and you’re trying to you’re constantly on how this is making that king show want to shoot line as much as possible. And you’re mentally concentrating on your hand. And you imagine like I’ve been on doing a mural, it takes me like 9-10 hours a day. Doing this is fucking exhausting.

Dan:
Mentally, probably mentally and physically. So it’s a combination.

Craig:
Yeah. So give me be kind of honest with yourself and what you’re capable of doing like I hadn’t done a mural beforehand. And I was like, yeah, I guess I’m, I’m like three days was like I’m fucked, I have to leave it on. I’m like there’s no way I’m going. On and. And I had to call on help to get me do it. And fortunately that happened but I learned from that situation back then because it ended up I’d go to see days but then I had to take at least a week and a half off because I was just fucked. I was like no but was like not just maintenance as didn’t actually didn’t golf. And then I didn’t have the motivation to go and get back to work, which which said which is fine to take a break. As always, day breaks up projects and stuff, but uses in like couple of days. We can institute, which is a process that I have schedules scheduled, an actual holiday. So it’s all these considerations, especially being a one man band, because as much as I’m doing the work, I am project management.

Craig:
I kind manage Kerins. I am everything that comes in an agency desire since I am working that schedule. And especially if you’re I’m working on a project which has already. Then I am the one who speaks the H a single one of those clomp a like three answers of Colombia’s name. I need to say I permeation they’ve given me enterprise and presentation then or even take it to the client. So as far as I’m doing the same work, I’m done. So there’s so much to it being an independent, but to be brutally honest, I wouldn’t change it for the world is watching is like crazy and it can be stressful. Like, I also love what I do and I love everything that comes of it. And I reason why I love doing it is the fact that I can turn round and say to myself, the goal that you you don’t all add on your own that you should be crazy. So like I like by the Macario, they better show me that I did everything that’s cheap. Like, I’m extremely proud of myself and goal. Yeah. That was you know, it wasn’t you didn’t need someone else to help you out a helping hand like you’ve done it all on your own. You made that stop. And I’m huge of pride myself about regardless of it’s a small time a local client to be. I kind of I feel like you’ve done it on your own and you may not. And I pride myself on that. It’s about things that drives me every single day and hopefully in the next 20, 30 years and I’ll look bad actually, and go fuck. Yeah, well, well done Craig.

Dan:
I think, are you quite competitive?

Craig:
Oh, yeah, yeah.

Dan:
I think we must share common, because listening to your answers on that, that’s resonates very strongly for me in terms of not necessarily doing it all myself, because I don’t do it all alone. Because, I mean, obviously getting a shitload of help and support from the team. But still that I guess the ability to be the master of your destiny and create something from scratch or create something from nothing. I think that to me is. Yeah. Like what you’re saying that is really motivating.

Craig:
Oh, totally. The competitiveness is kind of strange. So I used to be a professional football player before design. So that’s when I started, from young teenager to early adulthood, football and my competitiveness all came from that like the upbringing and professionalism, like always trying to be the best you could possibly be. So I took those qualities and to continue that, and I have I’m not, I would say is probably one of the main drivers of how well have done in that short term. And is that competitiveness to always better myself each single time, every single day. And I don’t ever compete myself against anyone else. I never do that. I compete against me. And that is the biggest challenge out of all. I think people need to realize that and in a world where you’re there’s so the social media and there’s constant other people who are maybe in your lane fields and you’re like, oh, shit. It’s not that that’s, fuck that, like, be better than yourself that you did the day before. Every single day I always think to myself, what small things can I do to become a better person? A better creative, a better designer and better at my business, like I think about that every single day. And that competitiveness pushes me on.

Craig:
And if I didn’t have that, I wouldn’t definitely not be where I’m at right now. I probably wouldn’t have my business. Because if I don’t have that drive and determination, then I don’t know why I didn’t. I probably, I maybe I’d be a designer still. But I’d probably work for someone else, which I don’t want to do like. So that competitiveness is hugely driven. My my life actually, my life and career, definitely.

Dan:
I think that’s a real athlete mindset as well in terms of like incremental improvements over time. So, you know, like, I got a friend who gave some advice on hiring salespeople and she was saying higher athletes, because I understand small improvements over a long time lead to a great result. So it’s not the very goal orientated, but at the same time, they’re willing to do just, you know, be a little bit better than yesterday everyday and just constantly get better and better and improve.

Craig:
That’s amazing.

Dan:
I think what you touched on there of compare yourself to yourself rather than everyone around you. I mean, we’re inundated with amazing, cool things on Instagram, Behance, LinkedIn, like it’s very easy to start to fall into that trap of comparing yourself to oh they worked on Nike or they worked on, you know, they worked on Adidas, or that person’s working with Apple now and anything like, how am I ever gonna get there?

Craig:
Yeah, it’s so true. Thinking back to the incremental steps, like, see that mindset like that was so important for me. So back when I first started, it’s like when I graduate, I knew exactly what I want to become, which was amended and specialised like we mentioned like I know from day one, I know many of you will have that. So I knew when I want to go buy it, I had to make statens sauce to get to that point.

Craig:
So I graduated in Glasgow and then moved straight to London to what looks like a design agencies that now just to get experience and design and land how an agency works and stuff. But every evening and weekend I would practice and practice and practice on my craft or take all three lessons. I did passion project as a personal project. And I did this on two and a half years before anyone even realized who I was. And it taken led to fields that every night.

Craig:
So when I say every single name, what would do as I would dedicated one hour a night. So everyone thinks a passion projects of practicing any and it needs to be a huge big chunk. I get to very small steps. So I would get home at my place in London as a job with, say, sex. How sex. I would trip my dad out, say had sex between seven and then hacerte in half a I would give myself one hour to practice and reinicke and have taken Latson. What one. That painting. Are you in pain or pain. Just practicing I want. And then I would relax for the rest of the evening. So if I was doing a one, even on one hour on a Monday to Friday, that’s five hours. And then on Saturday morning I would maybe get myself say four or five hours of practice. And so that’s essentially ten hours a week of practicing on top of my full time job. And as you accumulate over two and a half years, well I’m not going to do out my own.

Dan:
It’s alright man, we’re designers, like we’re creatives, we don’t have to do that.

Craig:
There is no way I could do that. But the accumulation of a large amount of time spent practicing and practicing the craft in a watch and then not has benefited me in yet. So those small steps have opened the doors to where I might note. And she seems off now. I still maintain to prioritize a time to do aggressive projects.

Craig:
But no, I’m in a fortunate position where passion project come commercial work, work. And so I get to have fun doing the passion one which turns into client walks. So all that hard work and after that, before all those incremental steps, has led to the what now? So I truly believe in that mindset 100 percent.

Dan:
And do you think having that big goal and clear goal defined, you know, provided that discipline to be able to do that every day, every night after work, one hour on the weekends, three hours? By having that goal really clear, identified.

Craig:
I think so. For me, 100 percent. And I know a lot of people do half. And that’s key because I failed in the way to find out what the passions are, what they love doing. And I still love you. But once you find out wherever that is, that you observe love like and if you want to pursue that as actually you are doing it for the rest of your life, then you need to set a goal to make it not happen. Like even if it’s baby steps that make it not a reality. So I started to not clear definition. And my head was to become this independent. So when I graduated, I thought to my end at first I thought to. So I will be at least five, six years. No, Kabab, as somebody who is actually working in an agency before I write on my own because I so I read in blogs and had advice for mortise, basically that’s what everyone does. And as time after those two and a half years I was like, fuck that, I don’t know. I was like, I had this. I was going, I’m not going to wait up on my desk and I’m going to go and China. And someone buys us two and a half years and two after graduating. Don’t get it wrong at that point. I was also reading a lot of business books that are good blogs.

Craig:
I was asking a lot of experienced people who are independents like Hedgie due to gain as much at base as possible. It wasn’t like I just fell all one day. I said so. Yeah. Dean as much as basis, but I just feel fucking Lester and I just jumped up to be unknowing and intellectually. I remember when I had one month’s rent available, my bank balance like to be next month’s rent and I didn’t have any other money, but I just had this huge shift belief in myself that I could make this work. And fortunately, I got three like sketch, which is like a two week gig. And it was the equivalent to like two months paid. And my last job, I was like, this is this is fucking awesome. After the two each reality check then and it was like shit like it’s freelance. What it doesn’t. It wasn’t like coming. And as much as I wanted to come on. So but Dana said to get a little pieces of whatever because I said being more vocal online education about connecting with people. And I was getting and jobs and the first few years and then in Washington. So I even look like mental, how the fact did I do that? I did not have the money. But I did. If I did survive. I know every year I’ve learned from you safe. Learn from them mistakes laugh for my situation. And every day, every single month, every year has been a stay and still no game improving to get better. So I’m up, I believe in goal setting. So every say I go every week. I set a goal every month. Every year I say I goal. So what else do you do right now? I’m in my home schedule and I’ve got on my wall look out like a piece of paper with your local zoning. So you’re one. Also, what what would achieve in year one and year three year five year old article I want to achieve and I’m looking at the list as I speak and I’m like, I’m still not. I’ve done not. I’ve done not. Tech. Tech. Tech stuff we achieved. I’m still working on making progress or not. And then I’m looking. I go and I will get them. I will have no idea. I’m looking at this situation right now. It’s all she knows. I’ve got a hole in the home and a home should do a broad. And I’m saying I’m broke without us. And he said I should have brought in the sunshine. So I don’t know if that’s Spanos Australia. I have no idea. But I’m like, I will make that happen. I have no idea how I’m gonna make it home by won’t make a home.

Craig:
But having those short term and long term goals has played a huge part in my career, like a huge pop, but didn’t have those goals. Then I would be struggling. I’d think I did major struggle because think having goals basically gets me up in the morning. It makes me feel like I have a purpose to go and do something and achieve something. And having those goals makes our reality. For me. Yeah, definitely. Put it back up.

Dan:
It’s something that we spend a lot of time on as well. I mean, and it’s hard to do. It’s hard to actually crystallise them and really recall them. But once you do have them, I think it gives you such a good purpose to work towards. And it’s important, obviously, like you said, to break them up into smaller milestones. So it’s not just this lofty five year. It’s. Yeah. You know, month. You know, it could be a weekly go, like you said a day ago. I think it’s so important to be able to break it up and have that incremental sort of incremental steps towards it. When you were starting out in those early years, you were doing you practice new craft after work. Did you share that kind of content with the world? Were you posting it or did you actually. Was we reserving that? You know, like when when did you actually start sharing it with people?

Craig:
I started sharing right away because I was proud of the work. I was what I’ve achieved and see my own development. Like, I didn’t care for likes or shares and stuff like that.

Craig:
Like what I thought was I put myself into the universe. I’m showcasing that what I can do. And I change that Belgian everybody else. That was my mindset. I didn’t chase. Like I said, the in the shows because I was going to call old because I remember Châtelet also was like five, like each and every little Mazama, you know. Do you know what I mean?

Dan:
Even loaded on the track. It’s not like ‘Likes’ are gonna pay the bill. It’s like, unless it’s unless it’s real clients or. Yeah.

Craig:
I always make sure that. The word I was putting out is the work. I want to get hired for. So that was a big thing. So these passionate. I always believe that passion projects because I’m looking to find who I am and my brand. Even to this day, every person of color that I do see possible just a basic widget as a market to for me. I use out purposely for that reason because we look at it as I want to put in the work in my class for the work in my profile. Is that what I want to get hired for? So I want to get hired to do a sculpture, 3D sculpture or doing a mural or doing that beautiful crafted piece. Then I need to showcase the one on the wall capable of doing. So that was my mindset from the early days. And that is why I stand my career. So I was born on to social media. I would send it to blogs I like. I was honed in blogs I used like I used to like send about 40 emails on one project and probably get ignored from everyone. I just can’t get past and went too fast. And then eventually it would break. And then eventually, you know what, kids on me, so much I’m going to put you in can create an art magazine. And always the first time I ever go, any kind of exposure from a blog publication was computer magazine based in a U.K., you know, to be an off magazine, don’t you? No, no. I basically like a a bag of can, a magazine kind of thing. And unfortunately, of budget just goes it goes after twenty years of going. But they are going to be a block as well. So hugely, hugely inspiring and blow kind of thing over the years.

Craig:
So the but also the publication by into I mean some of my fast writing about some sort of free lunch joke, which was a window beautiful idea for a barber shop, and it was like a five day job. And I get paid and the haircuts lessons as I wrote, because these two guys, these are guys are just starting out. And they’re part of the brand. Three, four is like, how do we as a brand stand out in front of our competitors on this high street? Because it was on a barber shop and paid the media attention online. So they had these people by Wendle. And I was like, let me do it. Wendell Mudo and I will create a social media campaign. Right. Meeting no one we can deal with. I made of seen expection, all of us, and we can showcase it online. So it’s a different perspective. A publisher without a fucking hear why I’m on it was Kreis it. But they didn’t have any money. So they cut my hair for the best part of my year of some of the progress that we had. Yeah. Yeah. I believe they went. Oh so did up. And did I say not in our marketing. India ended up doing a three page spread on it, talking about the process and the final outcome. Have I came my to stuff like that and I blew me away like that was like a huge relief there as much as your own. And you’re just really I mean. Well I kind a glimmer of hope you could see in terms of the gold’s taking on the walk and then just give me a bit more confidence and my own ability a little bit. And then from now, I just kept Hesam Block more and more.

Craig:
And even to this day, Ğabdulla relationship with a lot of these episodes. No, so I wouldn’t say pestilent. But when I do share the ball with them to maybe come back to me saying take amazin walk or maybe not race for this issue because it’s based on something else kind of thing. So. You’ve got to understand that when you’re late contact and blogs and publications like, it’s not to say that you’ll want to share issues, maybe not right for whatever the time that they’re showcasing. And that’s all understandable. But from that barbershop, those two guys I know we don’t just like to be won’t become one of the most successful barber shops in Scotland. They’ve won that city of four shops. They’ve got like fuckin ten or fifteen feet walking in each shot. They’re like a global grind. They’re intent on being a bottom. So do we all want to him? Since then, I’ve been paid to.

Dan:
I was going to say, I was going to ask if you have commissioned anything else?

Craig:
Yeah. So we’ve done a few murals over the years actually afterwards about what can it cost them for being late and stuff like that. So yeah Edith it’s not working. Goodbye to relationships. So Edith was a friend of friends recommended me and now we’re best friends. And I was, I was writing and stuff like that. So we stayed on top of attainment and told our business and life and stuff. So it just showed you how those relationships develop and friendships, which is really, really important.

Dan:
Yeah, completely. So looking at the last year for you. What’s been the highlight that stood out last year was fucking unreal.

Craig:
Like, absolutely unreal. From a personal level to a cuter level.

Craig:
So when I got married, which is awesome.

Dan:
Congratulations.

Craig:
Cheers mate! And then until the end of the year, me and my wife, Holly, we’re having a lot we’ve got. So.

Dan:
That’s awesome.

Craig:
So that’s been amazing. Men out front, both in terms of design, like in a Cadillac at the tail end of the year. I’m kind of out to speak of it in March, but I’m working with one of my dream clients and all I can say is take it. All right. That’s all I can say. This is unbelievable levels for me.

Dan:
How did you learn that? Can you share how you got it?

Craig:
It came about in November time. And I came through VR, an agency who are doing the kind of refresh or rebrand of the club. And we have been following my work for years, actually. And the cave director who contacted me be a link, then watches my life then. So fucking awesome. But I didn’t know who it was. Beatle and delaying in the Massachusetts type project for a football club. Ardizzone chose it and I was like, yep, let’s go, John. And then when I walked into the meeting and that is a big screen and it had the name of the club on it and the instant reply was fuck off face. And I’ve never met these people in my entire life. And they already started laughing. And I was like, oh, shit, I bet that holds all I say shit. Sorry. So again, I ask, is this fucking real sweat? And I’m like, I’m sorry. I’m just so what? Like, I’m so we say, oh, that’s I mean from that it was you. And I’m still working on you know, I just I can’t even come to terms of how much this means to me. Hopefully in the next it was truly meant to be launched in the next couple of months boffing. It’s going to be delayed now, all the sales and everything assortments. But Duilio, an emotional pretzel level guys coming in this plan and it walks like actually got more things like that better. So that Big Delenda last year. Well I’ve got to do a lot traveling.

Craig:
So I was in a show last year where we call up and have done an international speaking to our like our goal to travel across Australia and share my story and I’ve got to bring my wife along, which is awesome. I got to speak all Fassel in Barcelona, which is polu. When I opened the world’s biggest as ankle. I hope so. Paul Taun best face at the moment.

Craig:
It was probably all face on Barcelona because I go to work on this incredible project which was basically hand painting on a car. But the whole reason why that was so amazing because in the accumulation of the whole experience. So I was asked to go speak out school, which has always been a dream of mine and a goal of mine since my early days. And one of those ones where I thought I was out there like five years from now, if I say yes or no. But it happens much sooner than I expected. Which is also a delight. It was so couple of days before I was flying out off the bat. They had company contingency and letting people go up to Jack. And one of our sponsors, a Modise, that the appearance of asked if you would like to have paint on a car during the festival so you’ll get three days paid. And I was like, fuck. Of course, the brief was basically, can you clear a beautiful you in Barcelona and a cap so that you’d be in a segment of the city and there’s collaboration. And the festival was like, all right, cool thing. So I remember being on the plane that was painted on as old iconic. Can I see it? 500 cars is so beautiful. And it was a white vanel wrapped for me humpin on.

Craig:
So it wasn’t a big deal where all they can embrace the grinding on the floor. So they put our weight. I don’t want it for me. You had it on. So I remember. And up on its first day and was it three days? Had to do it. But it forced a rained and at all. I was like, No, I’m in Barcelona. It shouldn’t rain. I’m here for sunshine a ball on that first day. I was one of the last speakers and I was in this kind of sight. I was in a meeting at a knot which folded like two and a half thousand. I was in the same table, which holds like one thousand five hundred and just big massive monkey. And I remember in the morning time, I thought I’d go see one of the elite speakers, just a guy Raybans, what it was like, what was going on. And there’s was a lot of headliners and damsels, big people in the design of the ship who are speaking. And I remember going out. And so I go see this person. I’m not going to name them and see that tall and see what the codes are. You got all this stuff and I am against it. And I was like mushrooms half. So I’m like, this guy’s a fucking bigwig. You’ve been in the game for knows and no one’s here.

Craig:
And I’m like, I do know if it does. Accumulation of interest had been Hannan’s. It was a team of. I don’t know. And that took about a minute because I was like, I’m Paul Metzler, 5:00 today. I make people pull a fucking want to go home or leave or whatever or so that fortune off. I ended up keeping a low back on the car and I did my main dolto. So I remember I was going have paid and that’s kind of me No one at of time that no one really knew what was there with a corcos, just like Adelaida. So that’s going. And so some people are going always going to get it now and then. So one of the workers who was tied to Fassel democracy creates sacred duty codes. You oh oh shit too. So they say me through this get a bite out of the market day. And I was game. I made guns out Nazi the that answered yet. And there was someone speaking and then a woman who is a member in the meeting. Have you noticed a code yet. Well I was like, no, I’m not. Look, she says, you mean you look have a look and open the continent continent. Peter. It was a full house, full host of people set to.

Dan:
Do you get nervous, speaking in front of crowds like that?

Craig:
I didn’t have time to be like that, but yeah, I do like the most nervous part for me is not to walk in on his stage and say, my gosh, what does it matter? I can pop up and get going. I just think about it as I speak to you right now. So we’ll just affordably do what we say to me. Have you looked at, say, Israel? I don’t know what you mean. There was literally two people wait to get in to listen to any speak asshole. What the fuck is going on here? Because I did not point. I didn’t consider myself to be as an old, well known or have done all. I just admitted that I had a bad day in my head at that point, which is kind of natural and not Bullmoose, because in 40 minutes I’ll be debating. So I feel like I do usually compare myself of that moment like anguish compared himself to like speak up. And I’m like all I got. I’m like, don’t. That comparison really fucked me up actually. And I don’t usually do it. And I pull it because I one moment fuck that national moment demands a full court. They take my main set to fuck compared it myself to people like just be you. Do your thing. Take so to mama. Get on stage. I mentally like you’re shutting yourself because I’m looking for you. You get. Because you’re cool. But everything’s going to work out. And. It was a genetic code. And as I said, my colleagues. And I can see people like smiling and the code.

Craig:
And my story is that like a quite emotional as well. And there’s a lot of trials and tribulations by decompression. And you can there’s a lot of good stuff to it. And it’s an inspiring story. And it has moments in it that has lost so much joy and everybody connected with me at that moment. It is like an intrinsic skill. It’s just so amazing. And it was one moment when I spoke and made a personal about life since the height and challenges that face. And that’s one guy who can always a man actually sounded right. I’d say today, the audience, I guess you might just found one thousand five hundred giving. And I can see the. I can always count on going to people, as you said, right in. But basically, I see something and then she replies saying yes. And I looked out and I think everyone was going to die. And she said, no suicide, often because of a social and personal finances. I can’t remember. But I was. Well, unfortunately, almost died. I one state because a whole crowd started copying me in this moment. I’m, I think, an emotional thought about but not feeling this like that. Personal responses like how we connected with all were the this was so fucking unreal. I know. I didn’t imagine I talked to all of us. So after I finish, I got a standing ovation that just blew me away. So that was like I can cannot say to my name. Oh, is it is unreal.

Craig:
Like, I couldn’t in a man of people who wait outside to talk to me. And this is people from like Italy, Spain, all over the world who like from different cultures. But all resonates with the story, which I think is so fucking beautiful, is I don’t like you don’t need to be in a decade when you can actually be anywhere. We’ve all got the same challenges, the bulk of the same similar stories, and they’re all connected the same way. And it made me realize that our kids have made and sharing your. So for one night they, like everyone, escapes me. In the next morning, I tore off L.A. and I started hitting on this cop. And literally every five minutes of Friday night, I didn’t have it. Fifteen minutes like I would have someone do coming up to me saying, take your story. But I mean, like, I love four year war, a lot of what’s a good day. And it was incredible because I was getting to speak to these people. But they said they were trying to clean a car. And I was like I was just beautiful. Like, how do I all along? And I was out last night by a car. And I say that five minutes on and someone else would come up and it was so stressful because it was amazing. Biasutto sketch, I said, because I couldn’t finish in the car. And they tried to hide in the car, like which could only have got defeated, but always going to such cubin interaction I the car as well. So they’re putting pressures on me in the car. Whalen’s talking and tonight two people and it becoming this beautiful Cinergy all like human interaction as well as our social media engagement as well. Because the social media, you from all the brands like say this is one emotion gauge.

Craig:
Commentator, Robert controversy. This piece of off key part of that is that they shouldn’t be engaging with people who share my story. That’s lasted for about two or three days. Me and I was on cloud night. I like said on fucking real. It got to the point, though, when I was creating accounts. And I do say you’re making it to me and to their uncle up there. And she said, Listen, Kate, you’re gay. And indeed, you want to talk to you. Do you want us to help you paint on the car like you do? The Atlanta group called. I’m basically like a massive effort to see like I was a part of that. I don’t know where they got it done. Yeah. About four days was one of the best experiences of my entire life. In terms of design and in life. And I mean, people like from that concept is out. I’ve actually gained work and friendships and stuff like that. So that was probably one of the major highlights for me last year. Definitely. And what an experience. And also, like when you get to do talks and general experience is such a beautiful thing to do. I absolutely love it. And we people come to me and say, hope that’s part of the story inside me, or that’s what resonated in me, a different view. And when I read that there was decisions that you you shouldn’t be engineer, ought to be more experienced people, been in the game for 20, 30 years and one woman decided to go pursue their own dreams. Is it such a beautiful find? So being able to do that last year and share my story? It was just incredible. So far. And I’ve covered the roads.

Dan:
It’s great. I mean, we saw you and I say we my team and I saw you at the design conference in Brisbane in 2018, and yeah I was blown away by the talk. I mean, it was really, really inspiring and motivating. And also, I think we all appreciate the vulnerability of it as well. And just sharing the journey and like we’re talking about today, like, I guess how much time and effort went into finding your craft to do want to touch on. I feel like I don’t to rush through it. But is it something that you can talk about now in terms of maybe shed light a bit more light for our audience, or is it something that they can, we can direct them to?

Craig:
Yes, one lesson like women is the challenges we face. Will. Starting a business is made in China, this ends all that. How do you make us?

Craig:
Well, the stress of money coming in the door walk in late. I was Chinese improve trying to pay as they were trying to get the next job in the door. Like, that’s up to me. So I Seidel’s London Samila should do in London. Paul, when I see him, I should do it. It was actually a cobban. I would say that the main house. But like I stayed in a cabin in London, which is like Bazoft. I did it, but it was my bedroom. But it’s also my schedule so effectively. And that’s when whatever I would be trying to make a business walk, that was all. I would just constantly eat and sleep and design and business and all that. Chai’s any became better, very productive. And I did in all my friends and family were basically back home in Scotland and it go too much for me. And I basically have Pargneaux.

Craig:
I was twice in one month actually. And it’s fucking horrible, horrible experience and it’s quite overwhelming kind of situation because I felt one I feel all alone in London and to give my own like my dad and my older brother was in London at the same time and they were massive for me, like I’ve always been myself, I mean, just for always being there for me. But Agnes is saying we’re. I just felt like there was a call in to go back home to Scotland to see my friends and stuff and. Do my mind off at Zanies London just consumes me. It consumed me in the sense of like the case a dog eat dog world go now. And I’ve just never been like that. Personality wise, I’ve never been let down. And. It was just destroyed me, really. And then the patience of trying to pay the balance in Kosovo, one that is quite an expensive place to stay. I had enough and I can do it really. I’ll be even more specific.

Craig:
Like I remember I used to come by on this column very often. That’s actually nice. And that’s to see my mom was. And I was in projects up here as well. So one can stay until about with the force that is I’m just used to. And then one catchiness gives it to me. And that’s it. And the pain that I feel very unhappy with the president is becoming a different one than just becoming bidi. This wasn’t a joke then. I really was like my best friend. But, well, I was home. This is for Obama fans is what a mess. And then I was getting my flight back to London. And I remember I sat in the airport and suddenly feels like soccer. I mean, I’m like, why the fuck am I going back to London? Why am I going back? And why am I going about this and what that means? No, not at all. And I had to take my life and I didn’t want. Did you say is like who does it like seems like you do what makes you happy, like you want to come home and Kabul. But as often as a few people will understand, you walked in and out of your way to no matter what.

Craig:
I always had a support base which was gay bashing and celebrity and I and because I always felt like I had to be in a major city because that’s where my reputation is or the clients are, that I cannot fail. Stupid feeling that I had to be there to get the walk on. So I said to myself.

Craig:
See you in London for three months and now I’m going. Right. That was on the Monday. Softly Then the Sunday. And on the Monday, I say I’m going to combine three months time and then on Tuesday. So now I’ll come by and see you next time. And then on the Wednesday, I just fall funk. Bass. I then asked my bike’s hired divine and I left London. I drove my on by about someone and I remember seeing the rhythms of Scotland. And I started to celebrate as I celebrate. And honestly, it’s such a release of tension, just like goal at that moment. It was such a kind of special moment for me. Breakthrough. As a breakthrough, actually moments, it made me realize that I might need to go home. And it was one of probably the best days I’ve never made with school back home. And from that moment, because of the stress and anxiety just suddenly left. It was hard to make a strong decision to leave because I was so caught up in the whole grains and like I could be lonely because I gave me a reputation without bullshit. Doesn’t Michael. So coming from away from that, my main saying my and such close up makes it. I mean, basically someone that I love in the best way possible. Like I see in our small time episode of GOSAL Playskool book, Beautiful Little Khushal literally undergoes a waste of the water like the Cleese’s. Both those like independent stores and shops and supplies people place.

Craig:
People are super friendly and because I love it. And that’s a beautiful hobby. Hobbie amazing environment. I’m producing the best one possible. And the biggest thing for me was when I came back home, I see them. So I’m going to work w and actual clients all across the world from my hometown. I’m going to make that possible. And it’s been four years in the making of be making that’s possible and fucking making my dream become a reality. I’ve always wanted to buy a home. Like how a family like seven homes. Should you want to go somewhere else? I’ve always wanted to. Ever since I was in London, I’m not sure all eyes will work at all. But a game of love in this life. And now I’m doing it by saying myself, goals and striving to meet that dream become a reality. So the journey of good through the nobility of anxiety and stress, like with a change without if I want to bike, like everything happens for a reason. So if I get my head like that but give to do that, I say maybe they live to that point. But while I want people to do is realise that for them themselves, you can. You don’t need to go for those moments like land from when I’m out right now I’d love to the point of traffic continue when I’m shooting these negative moments because it had a chick like costed me as a person.

Craig:
Don’t do it like learn from these moments and you can go on and on for dear life and positive career and the reason you want to do it. You can do it from your home. You can do it from a small town. What a crash course as a possible, because that one does doesn’t want to talk. You can talk to someone and they’ll say that what we are doing right now. Yeah. You’re in Australia and I’m in Scotland, right, that couldn’t be done years and years ago. But now it can. We can collaborate to you guys. artwork and design is a fucking amazing stuff that can be possible.

Craig:
These situations that we are living in now. So that’s kind of where I’ve ended up now. And like I said, I’m living the most amazing life possible. Like, I’m happy as fuck. In the cheesiest way possible. I’m happy as fuck. It is, the reason why I’m happy as fuck is because I made decisions that made my life happy. That is the difference. I’ve never wait for someone else to make a decision for me to make my life happy. I’ve purposely, made decisions to live the life I want to live. And that is a key thing. A lot of creatives expect other people to give them an opportunity or to give them a platform to do whatever they want to do. You need to take responsibility for your own actions to make the life that you want to live. And that’s exactly what I did. Yes, it’s a fucking huge risk. But with huge risks, paves huge rewards. And that has been my mindset, I took huge risks my whole life and my whole career. And in everytime I’ve took a huge risk, something has paid off. And that’s what I believe in. And that is my philosophy in life. So hopefully that kind of mindset can help someone who is listening.

Dan:
I think that’s going to be so helpful for listeners and creatives to hear that, you know, if you’re in Australia, you don’t have to go to Sydney or Melbourne. If you’re in Brisbane or if you’re an original town, you can do it from where you are. And the same thing goes I mean, we have a culture where a lot of people feel like you have to go to New York or you have to go to London if you want to succeed in advertising. Whereas I just think and the cool thing is, you know, what I’m proud of about our time is we sort of have that share, that same mindset as you. It’s like we’re happy to to do something great from a hometown rather than having to be in a place where lots of other creatives live. Yeah, I think that’s really inspiring and really a positive message to put forward and not you know, I think it’s great that it sort of resonated with so many people over in Barcelona because I know it resonated with the audience in Brisbane. When you spoke, I mean, it was. Stuff that really stood up for the people there.

Craig:
Yeah. It even that experience in TDC in 2018, like that was my first irrational talk.

Craig:
You know, and when I came to Australia, like no one really knew that voice, like I’m being realistic. Like no one really knew that voice. A lot of the audience didn’t know who I was. Stuff like that. And I was still with you. But when I shared that story that they like, everything changed. I think a lot of people like you, like we can I guess, automatically right after that

Craig:
I mean, you’ve got a strong connection ever since, but my I’m a strong but I do what the show is a community, because at that moment and from that confidence like that was a special I like. I mean, you get back shares to my hands as well. I for giving me the opportunity and for believing in someone like me who maybe like. Didn’t exactly have they died and all that stuff? He believed that means apprehension and belief in what I was doing and what I believed them. And I asked that. And I loved that from him. And he gave me an opportunity to share that story. And I think that was really, really important, because from that, I made my mom told me, like he did on the awesome. And I was being bullied when of the tops because of that. And I was like, I’ll be brutally honest as well, like I was not. So the force took my child away from sculling to learn a few hands. But I froze my neck like six months on. But as you saw in Scotland and then automatically I’m going to show you have to respect one. And then from now, it’s just snowballs.

Dan:
Like you said, you’re not afraid of taking huge risks. I just taking a leap. Mate who inspires you?

Craig:
Sometimes I would go back to family like families. I always doing a big thing for me and my mom has been a huge just fine. And I know this can actually shake is a lot and say that’s what I’ve been. She’s been advocating for me, for what she sacrificed for me, my run up to the mandatory to come to giving me a platform to give me everything that I was before. And definitely even in Israel, like so much disease, disease known, she has been alive. Like he’s always looked after me. He’s always been there for me for an early age, like he’s always been a big brother role for me and you. Did I say like. So-called meet me at all. Like scorched earth, would you be in danger? And I’ve got to say, my wife is like, yeah, she’s fighting every single day. And so look to how hard it is, what I’m saying. So it’s much like I would love to see someone in the design field stuff a lot like the SUV admire. And I love the way the audience is inspired books, but I always believe the. You need two people closest to home are the ones that really is priority. Absolutely. But their sacrifices and the love that they made for me is my side people. Yeah, if it’s to be flooded on, it presents a gift that has been missed by me. So I just feel like I’m doing that show. So I always pronounce name Joe Sunshine based on that show, based on Manicka who used to be our age. They will be slobbering all the time. He’s an exciting time for me. He’s worked with some of the most amazing bands and he’s constantly like innovating and doing new things by this amazing people. Crozet even seasoned college students by and worked all the time. I gotta say not. I’ve got a whole list of people I can find out on my end. I’ve got to find Raymond. Because. Cause I have my file on it.

Dan:
So moving on from the who’s someone remarkable that we should know or speak to is a wall.

Craig:
I came across this guy when I did my show into it as a guy called Peter Brenan, dude. He’s based in Sydney. He runs agency. I like chicken. I know what I do. Yeah, I’ve heard of them.

Craig:
Yeah. Pete, Pete, Pete is genuinely, one of the best guys I’ve ever met in my entire life. So I quit by going to this, like when I was a marshal was in Sydney and Pete reached out to me. Never known Pete before. And he said, Yeah. I mean, it’s your lesson. I’m sitting at your nest in the nest, Roxanne. I read your body used to wait. And you call the resignation she’s ever lost. Cafferty. But. Also known as is often the thought with the prime minister and outsider. He had the house on fire. Like really, really that. And he has gone that sexual assault. It’s really, really Aysgarth throwing stones. And he’s growing guy and so genuinely wanting the nicest guy on the left night. And he won’t really connect to the at five. And my wife was over there. Right. So you imagine you want to go say, I want to do that. And I’m going on a date. And when people want to speak to me and I’ll say I’m doing a job as oh, and my wife said this AIDS came off on our own and I stopped playing a mommy is Oak’s that and wanted to be on that one. But the only thing about this show you this ain’t community even better when that man was so fucking friendly. My ladies are all off its straight to go home but a nation.

Craig:
But there are also families or native soil. So I feel. But the amazing thing is, is when I was finished talking that people would always come to me. But somebody will too. I like sweet talk and I call this such a beautiful thing because I’ve been in many talks before and that doesn’t happen. Pete, I always mess this up or people that’s an emotional and he basically downloads up to insights on the way to her and she beat up a confession. And I write and I can remember. I didn’t get sleepy. You sit me. I’ll catch up. And then Alex’s piece. Wonderful. Got really, really good. I got chatting. Ended up when and I say the hangover is like three or four. I was at home and we’ve been in contact ever since. And he’s done amazing things at the agency. EOD families and crazy are highly hired at and mainstream. Thank you. Just a tall, tall guy inspired it like inspires me every single day. Even a source of following in East Caucus and links in all of this planet to the resonates. Really, really awesome guy. And we have to connect, Amando. I’ll definitely do. I’ll do it soon. As soon as we finish up on the show. I’ll let you know. Jake. Thank you, sir. I thought up guy.

Dan:
So wrapping up, what’s your favorite quote or the best piece of advice that you’ve ever been given?

Craig:
You know what, like on. I’ve got a tone right. But I believe an implicit affirmation. So every morning, every day I say any positive affirmations at light and a whole list of stuff it is I should like got everything I’ve got. It’s almost like you wanted to call me is I always resonates to me as that’s I commit today to do what it takes to succeed. I take responsibility for where I am. And for that quote really stands out to me, because it makes me assess everything that I do every single day, like take responsibility for the situation you’re trying to buy currencies, weirdness, pandemic, right. Businesses, Arsham Shop. Those businesses go on sale. The people are losing jobs left, right and center. So take responsibility for that situation. How can you make it better? So I say that to myself every single day and it makes me think, how can I make my business survive? Reaching out to people, speaking to clients, being defense, how can you help in any possible way? And I think that can I keep them in to myself to make sure that I succeeds and those that cause such a situation to I mean, to ask it every single day. And that’s usually a promise to me. What I need to do and what I’m telling myself to do responsibly. And if I didn’t have that, then I would be like an aimless task for me. So that statement from you to all that resonates. And it makes me. Like strong and purposeful way forward. And every single day. So that’s the one for me, basically.

Dan:
That’s brilliant, I like that. And mate, to finally wrap it up. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. But where can we direct people to find out more about you?

Craig:
Well, so far, I got it. I mean, there’s a fucking loved it.

Dan:
I don’t think you’ve sworn yet don’t worry.

Craig:
I can’t believe I just said that.

Dan:
No no it’s alright.

Craig:
No I’ve loved it. I really loved chatting with you and really admire what you guys are doing. What you’re doing personally as well in bringing this and inspiring people it’s really really amazing of you. To find me, you can see my work at craigblackdesign.com. You could find me on instagram, twitter all the social media jazz, At underscore craig black. But connect with me on LinkedIn. Quite heavy on LinkedIn just now.Craig Black. And you’ll find me on there. If you want to send me an e-mail. We’ll catch up that way. Hello@craigblackdesign.com. I would love to connect with people, chat with people and reach out and let’s chat basiclly. And that’s the best place to find me. And if you ever come to Scotland come to Gourock in Scotland. I’d be more than willing to show you some kind hidden gems along the way, you’ll have a great time.

Dan:
That’s awesome.

Craig:
So hopefully people would enjoy that.

Dan:
Cheers Craig. Thanks very much mate.

Craig:
No worries.

Dan:
Have a good one. See you!

Craig:
Cheers mate.

Dan:
Thank you for listening to this episode of Discover Someone Remarkable. If you enjoyed it, please share it with your network. To support us, please subscribe and leave a five star review. To learn more about us or the guests on this show, visit dsrb.com.au/podcast. DSR Branding exists to inspire people to love what their work represents. We hope that this episode has inspired you to think differently.